Issue #34 of New Noise Magazine features an in-depth look at hardcore music. Featuring everyone from your old favorites still releasing cathartic tunes to dynamic live photographers to the scene’s young up-and-comers, we’re proud to be shining a spotlight on a hardcore community that is all-inclusive and extremely open. Whether the bands are ripping through their brutally honest lyrics onstage or crushing a breakdown, their energy moves crowds, hearts, and other communities alike. Time to get moved and get movin’!

Hardcore Photographer Spotlight: Danielle Parsons

How long have you been shooting?

I’ve been shooting shows since 2005!

How did you get into shooting shows?

My hometown, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, had a relatively good scene back in the day. I remember just bringing my digital camera to shows early on and not putting much thought into it. I was just a teenager having fun. I didn’t expect anything to come out of it, but people were really into my photos—even though they were terrible. So, I just kept going.

Which venues are your favorite to shoot in and why?

Unfortunately, I haven’t shot too many shows here in L.A., but when I lived in Philadelphia, I loved shooting at Union Transfer, Redwood Art Space in Wilkes-Barre, and the Theatre of Living Arts. I loved Union Transfer and the TLA for the lighting and atmosphere. Redwood is a legendary venue where I had some of the best days of my life.

What’s the wildest show you ever shot?

Back in maybe 2007, Title Fight and Tigers Jaw played in a loft barn somewhere in the Perkasie—suburbs of Philly—area, and that floor was so close to caving in. It’s a miracle it didn’t, but I remember that was one of the craziest shows I’ve ever been to.

What makes a hardcore show different from any other genre?

In my opinion, hardcore shows can be a bit more relaxed. There isn’t as much security, no barrier, and people can basically just do whatever they want. There isn’t really any of that rockstar crap you see with most other shows.

How have hardcore shows changed or evolved over the past decade?

This is kind of a tough question to answer. I feel like the scene itself has just gotten larger. It’s also really cool to see bands who have been around since forever getting signed to major labels and going on larger-scale tours. I’ve been seeing a lot more women in bands, which is obviously fucking awesome to see! I saw KRIMEWATCH and Firewalker at Sound And Fury Fest for the first time, and I had so much fun.

Trapped Under Ice Danielle Parsons

Hardcore Photographer Spotlight: Jacki Vitetta

How long have you been shooting?

I’ve been shooting shows for, like, nine years, but not seriously until the last four years.

How did you get into shooting shows?

For years, Colorado Springs was a struggling scene that couldn’t support small bands, and then suddenly, it exploded around 2013. No one was documenting it, and it made me proud to be a part of it. I love my town and everyone in our scene, and this is a small way I can give back.

Which venues are your favorite to shoot in and why?

The Flux Capacitor in Colorado Springs will forever be my number one venue. There was a magic to that room that will never be forgotten. It was small, dirty, and run by some of my favorite people in the world. It was a room that gave a home to a bunch of people that didn’t know where else to go.

What’s the wildest show you ever shot?

Weekend Nachos or Full Of Hell at 71Grind [fest at] the Flux Capacitor were insane. The final Bane show at The Marquis in Denver. American Nightmare at Wrecking Ball 2015. Any show my friends are playing, honestly.

What makes a hardcore show different from any other genre?

I’ve never seen people feel so at home in any other scene. It’s a big family. We fight, we argue, but at the end of the day, we’re all in this together.

Gag – Jacki Vitetta

Hardcore Photographer Spotlight: Joe Calixto

How long have you been shooting?

Roughly 15 years. I started photographing my friends skating and pretty much everything. Then, when I moved to the U.S., I started shooting shows.

How did you get into shooting shows?

I started shooting shows when my cousin asked me to take pictures of his band playing the Cobalt Café [in Canoga Park, California]. I took photos of the band that played after them, and they saw my shit and asked me to shoot their show at Chain Reaction [in Anaheim]. I really enjoyed doing it, and so, one thing led to another, and here I am.

Which venues are your favorite to shoot in and why?

Some of my favorite venues in no particular order are:

924 Gilman in Berkeley. Do I need to say anything more about Gilman? Legendary.

Bonnerhaus in North Hollywood is run by the nicest people, and, for being a literal garage, they throw the coolest shows.

The Regent in Los Angeles is literally a few blocks from where I work. I used to hate this venue, but now, I can’t get over it. Plus, it’s the home of Sound And Fury [Fest].

The Regency Ballroom in San Francisco. I know it’s one of those “BIG” venues, but shooting here is almost close to perfect.

Tabernacle in Atlanta. I was here while on tour with Silver Snakes and ’68, and they hyped it up like crazy. Got there, and they were right! One of the most beautiful venues ever.

The Hi Hat in Highland Park, California. Another spot that is pretty cool to shoot at, and it’s a few steps from Donut Friend.

Programme in Fullerton, California. Every awesome hardcore show is thrown here. You would think, “How the fuck would they fit shows in a tiny skate shop?” Well, they do, and they have been. I hope this place never closes.

What’s the wildest show you ever shot?

I would say Bane’s final show at 924 Gilman. Shit was off the hook!

What makes a hardcore show different from any other genre?

I feel like there is more sense of community in hardcore and punk compared to other genres. I mean, obviously I’m not saying, like, the indie scene or the rock scene doesn’t have it, but I just feel like community is key in hardcore and punk.

Also if you stage flip at rock show, you’d probably get a cup of Bud Light thrown at you and get punched by a guy with an Ed Hardy shirt.

How have hardcore shows changed or evolved over the past decade?

Honestly, as a whole, I think hardcore hasn’t changed that much over the past decade. The DIY mentality is still there, you still see and hear about “crews,” the mosh pit still looks the same, but just like everything else in the world, the image has changed through the years. More Nikes, less Vans.

As for music, bands started to experiment with other sounds. There are bands like Full Of Hell and Code Orange who incorporate aspects of noise and metal. But that’s the thing about music—it’s all about innovation.

I’m also glad that the whole “boys club” mentality is slowly but surely fading away. I remember growing up, and I would hear guys talk about how weird it is that a girl is trying to mosh. Like, what gives? I personally don’t think anything is a boys club—unless it specifically said it is. But yeah, seeing more women in hardcore and punk and the recognition they get really warms my heart. I’ve said it so many times before: “Hardcore Ain’t No Boys Club.”

Culture Abuse – Joe Calixto

Hardcore Photographer Spotlight: Kiabad Meza

How long have you been shooting?

It’s been roughly four years since I started shooting shows. I think it all started when I shot For The Children 2013, which featured Donnybrook!, NAILS, Twitching Tongues, DOWNPRESSER, and plenty of local favorites at the time.

Which venues are your favorite to shoot in and why?

Longtime-running Programme Skate & Sound in Fullerton, California, has been killing it for me: a DIY venue owned by Efrem Schulz—vocalist of Death By Stereo—and Chris Gronowski. It’s the all-white ceilings and walls, which screams lighting perfection, and the compact space which make sick shows there speak for themselves. I’m thankful for everything they do. Honorable mention: downstairs of Hardcore Stadium in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

What’s the wildest show you ever shot?

I’ll go for most recent wild set. Fury has been able to impress me more and more every time, especially since their release of Paramount. The last time I saw them was at their energy-packed set at Sound And Fury ‘17. Honorable mentions from the top of my head: Bind at FYA [Fest] IV, Mindset at Programme in 2014, Foundation’s California show at Los Globos in 2016, Vein at Sound And Fury ‘16.

Incendiary at FYA Fest II by Kiabad Meza

Hardcore Photographer Spotlight: Reid Haithcock

How did you get into shooting shows?

I got into shooting shows because it was where I was hanging out all the time. Traveling with friends, seeing bands, hanging out late at night in parking lots—I wanted to start documenting the fun stuff I was doing. I got a shitty digital point-and-shoot and just started shooting everything I could. I’d learned back in the film days in high school, so having access to the photos right away kept me hooked.

Which venues are your favorite to shoot in and why?

My favorite venues to shoot are mostly the smaller venues, mostly run by or supportive of punk music. Great Scott, Hardcore Stadium, and Middle East here in Boston are the three I’m at most of the time. I love Gilman St. and the venues of my youth in North Carolina: Ace’s Basement, The Brewery, The Milestone. And I love shooting house shows.

What’s the wildest show you ever shot?

There have been so many wild shows over the years. It’s hard to even remember. One of my all-time favorites, though, was Modern Life Is War’s reunion tour show in Boston a few years ago. It was so incredible to see those guys play again after so long, and kids absolutely went nuts.

What makes a hardcore show different from any other genre?

At hardcore shows, there’s an amazing exchange of energy between the crowd and the band, and the smaller the stage and closer the crowd, the better that energy comes across.

How have hardcore shows changed or evolved over the past decade?

I think, while there has been change, it’s mostly superficial. Politics, styles, dress, [and] ways of crowd participation all have an ebb and flow as new kids come into the scene. There’s growth one way or regression the other, but the core experience stays pretty consistent. Navigating the social aspect has always been part of music culture, and hardcore is no different. Kids mosh or kids dance or kids are wearing white belts or kids are wearing double-XL jerseys or kids are writing political screeds or kids are writing deeply personal lyrics. It all comes and goes, but kids getting together and making music and having a release never stops.

Modern Life is War – Reid Haithcock_MENTIONED IN TEXT

Hardcore Photographer Spotlight: Wayne Ballard

​How long have you been shooting?

I started dabbling with photography around 2012, but didn’t start shooting consistently until 2013. I started shooting shows with a point-and-shoot camera, then slowly upgraded to a DSLR a few years later.

How did you get into shooting shows?

I’ve always had interest in photography, but upon moving to California in 2008, I was introduced to the photography side of the hardcore [and] punk scene. I started shooting shows out of an interest in photography and wanting to push myself with an artist medium.

Which venues are your favorite to shoot in and why?

Without a doubt, my favorite space to shoot at the moment is Programme Skate & Sound in Fullerton, California. The pure intimacy of the space size makes me absolutely love attending and shooting shows over there.

What’s the wildest show you ever shot?

I’ve shot a lot of wild shows that stand out for me, but my personal favorite may have to be Fury and Mizery’s LP release show in Santa Ana this past September. The full lineup was Fury, Mizery, Freedom, Forced Order, Stick Together, Lock, and Discrepancy.

What makes a hardcore show different from any other genre?

I feel like when it comes to hardcore [and] punk shows, the energy in the room is a bit more concentrated. Especially since a lot of these shows take place in smaller spaces.

Lock – credit Wayne Ballard

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